Economics

At the University of Surrey our School of Economics has a leading reputation and is well known for its vibrant research environment, excellent teaching and consistently high results.

Our School of Economics enjoys a strong profile in research and is home to two outstanding research centres: the Centre for International Macroeconomic Studies and the Surrey Energy Economics Centre. You can explore their topics of interest further by reading their discussion papers or discovering the latest news within the School. Such as one of our professors becoming a member of the Government’s Council of Economic Advisors; our School hosting a Bank of England lecture on the use of models in macroeconomics; our research collaboration with the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro to explore theoretical auction models; and the launch of our Children and Youth in Cities Lifestyle Evaluation and Sustainability (CYCLES) project.

Our renowned Professional Training placement programme gives our students the opportunity to work in their chosen field and gain valuable experience in the industry. Such as Tobias Sturmhoefel who worked at a macro and financial markets consultancy in London, Emily Armitage who worked at the HM Treasury, Richard Banbrook who spent a year at the Bank of England in the Prudential Regulatory Authority in London, and Domic Spanos who also worked at the Bank of England in the Monetary Assessment and Strategy Division.

There are so many reasons to study or research economics at Surrey. Read what the subject leaders for our economics courses had to say when we asked them what makes our degrees in economics different, from producing highly employable graduates to our friendly community of staff and students.

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“The best things about Surrey are the societies and the community. I love that I never feel alone.”
Aya Asali, Politics and Economics

“The quality of the School of Economics at the University of Surrey is what attracted me to study my Masters here.”
Camilla Spearing, Economics